Shall i compare thee to summers

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see, So long as there are people on this earth, So long lives this and this gives life to thee.

Sonnet 18 Language and Tone Note the use of the verb shall and the different tone it brings to separate lines. For rich caparisons or trapping gay?

Shall i compare thee to a summers day analysis essay

The stability of love and its power to immortalize the subject of the poet's verse is the theme. Here we have an interesting mix, the stress still on the opening word in the first foot, with the second foot of non stressed, stressed, non stressed, which makes an amphibrach. Thereby the fair lord's "eternal summer shall not fade," and the poet will have gotten his wish. Life is not an easy passage through Time for most, if not all people. Imperiously he leaps, he neighs, he bounds, And now his woven girths he breaks asunder; The bearing earth with his hard hoof he wounds, Whose hollow womb resounds like heaven's thunder; The iron bit he crushes 'tween his teeth Controlling what he was controlled with. Take that first line for example: Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Death shall not brag, says the poet; the poet shall brag.

And a trochee opens: Nor shall death brag thou wand'rest in his shade, The emphasis is on death brag, the double stress reinforcing the initial trochee to make quite a powerful negation. Literary Devices in Sonnet 18 With repetition, assonance, alliteration and internal and end rhyme, the reader is certainly treated to a range of device that creates texture, music and interest.

This famous sonnet is on this view one long exercise in self-glorification, not a love poem at all; surely not suitable for earnest recitation at a wedding or anniversary party, or in a Valentine.

Shall i compare thee to summers

Volume It follows the rhyme scheme abba cdcd efefef and gg. Immortalizing beauty through verse was a commonplace among the Elizabethan sonnet writers. This famous sonnet is on this view one long exercise in self-glorification, not a love poem at all; surely not suitable for earnest recitation at a wedding or anniversary party, or in a Valentine. In the first interpretation, the poem reads that beautiful things naturally lose their fanciness over time. Structure[ edit ] Sonnet 18 is a typical English or Shakespearean sonnet , having 14 lines of iambic pentameter : three quatrains followed by a couplet. For rich caparisons or trapping gay? Then, like a melancholy malcontent, He vails his tail that, like a falling plume Cool shadow to his melting buttock lent: He stamps, and bites the poor flies in his fume. In line 12 we find the poet's solution - how he intends to eternalize the fair lord's beauty despite his refusal to have a child. His friend is first compared to summer in the octave, but, at the start of the third quatrain 9 , he is summer, and thus, he has metamorphosed into the standard by which true beauty can and should be judged. And please be aware that not every line of every Shakespeare sonnet is written in pure iambic pentameter - a mistake made by many a supposed authority. Finally, the lover's beauty, metaphorically an eternal summer, will be preserved forever in the poet's immmortal lines. But has the poet really abandoned the idea of encouraging the fair lord to have a child? There's no doubting that this is a question so therefore the stress would normally fall on the first word, Shall.

In the first line it refers to the uncertainty the speaker feels. How to cite this article: Shakespeare, William. If the emphasis was on the second word, I, the sense would be lost.

The first meaning is more obvious: a negative change in his outward appearance. The final couplet reaffirms the poet's hope that as long as there is breath in mankind, his poetry too will live on, and ensure the immortality of his muse. This is called anastrophe, the change of order in a sentence.

As James Boyd-White puts it: What kind of love does 'this' in fact give to 'thee'?

notes shall i compare thee to a summers day

In this view, it can be seen as part of a transition to sonnet 20 's time theme.

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Summary and Full Analysis of Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare